Tag: Adjective

Weird Word: Satorial

by on Feb.24, 2014, under Weird Words, Writing

Satorial

Adjective

  • Of or relating to the tailoring of clothing.
  • Of or relating to the quality of dress

Example Usage:

“Look all I’m saying is that Florthians place an emphasis on satorial manners, being a race which communications exclusively through the visible spectrum. Which means we’re wearing the jackets, regardless of how much they make us look like an Olympic team competing for the most hideous team uniform.”

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Here is a word I’m sure I’ve never heard uttered and never seen until I stumbled across it in search of weird words. You can tell it hasn’t been very popular, since the number of meanings is small. There’s an extra meaning in anatomy I excluded because it seemed somewhat silly. Apparently there is a muscle group named satorial. Anatomy is weird.

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Weird Word: Austere

by on Feb.10, 2014, under Weird Words, Writing

Austere

Adjective

  • Grim or severe in manner or appearance
  • Lacking trivial decoration; not extravagant or gaudy

Example Usage:

The orb was anything but austere, covered in nobs, scratches, markings, and somewhat artistic designs, brightly colored in as obnoxious of a manner that an inanimate could muster on both its surface and inside, as could be seen through several semi-transparent layers.

Alternative Forms

  • austerer
  • austerest
  • austerity
  • austerely

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

So this word is uncommon but not rare or unheard of. I think it is likely found in a lot of victorian writings, which is silly because the victorians were all about decoration, although perhaps not gaudy. In regards to appearance, I believe I’ve heard this word used to describe the “old woman” or “head mistress of the school” trope. Still it is a nicely descriptive word even if it has a deceptive spelling. The pronunciation actually makes me think of something shining or with a specular highlight instead of severe or lacking in decoration.

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Weird Word: Umpty

by on Feb.03, 2014, under Articles

Umpty

Adjective

  • Being indefinite, unspecified

Example Usage:

The distance between the two worlds was umpty, if only because distance was not a concept the universe had opted to define yet.

Derived terms

  • umpteen
  • umptillion

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Every heard the expression “For the umpteen time…”? I did somewhere. I think more in my childhood. Perhaps a sitcom. I always assumed it was one of those made up numbers! It is! But it based off of something. The word umpty! Which was probably created from the made up number. This another fun word to say, but it keeps making me think of Humpty Dumpty which only proper nouns.

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Weird Word: Facinorous

by on Jan.27, 2014, under Weird Words, Writing

Facinorous

Adjective

  • Extremely wicked

Example Usage:

“Bullying Bough Bettle!” “Wicked Wacker!” “Facinorous Fecal Matter!” they crowd shouted, throwing every manner of confusing insult they could.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

I like this word. My spellchecker doesn’t but it rarely likes the words I post here. This in another one of those words that sounds evil which means it nicely fits our definition. It also feels like it has some relation to noses but I don’t know why I feel that way.

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Weird Word: Banausic

by on Jan.13, 2014, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Banausic

Adjective

  • mechanical; materialistic, uncultured.
  • utilitarian

Example Usage:

To say Marla was banausic was to be factually correct while also completely wrong, for while she was made of metal and coveted the odd fashion now and again, one could never claim that she lacked social grace.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

A weird word if only because its definition is so weird. I’m not sure if mechanical is meant to mean materialistic and uncultured? Perhaps this was an archaic meaning of mechanical? The utilitarian definition was far easier to use. I am not sure I’ll be using this word if only because I don’t know if know what it really means, despite looking it up!

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Weird Word: Avaricious

by on Nov.25, 2013, under Weird Words, Writing

Avaricious

Adjective

  • Actuated by avarice; greedy of gain; immoderately desirous of accumulating property.

Other Forms:

  • avarice
  • avariciously
  • avariciousness

Example Usage:

He stared at the device in a manner that was either covetous or avaricious but was quiet decidedly not both, as explained by expert grammarians when advised of the situation.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Just to mix it up, I’ve provided a word which is actually related to the word you believe it would be, that is avarice. I’ve included it because I’m no sure I’ve every actually seen the word used and I like how it looks. It is effectively a synonym for covetous, except that when one looks up the definition of covetous we find that it means inordinately desirous instead of immoderately. I suspect that means that avaricious wins, but I’m sure plenty of people disagree.

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Weird Word: Avaricious

by on Nov.18, 2013, under Articles, Writing

Avaricious

Adjective

  • Actuated by avarice; greedy of gain; immoderately desirous of accumulating property.

Other Forms:

  • avariciously
  • avariciousness

Example Usage:

His grabs were avaricious and it took some coaxing to get him to calm down and take it slowly.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

I’ve heard of avarice so I guess it is safe to assume avaricious existed but I’ve never heard it or seen it, which is why it is making our list today. It was actually a little hard to come up with an example, since I’m so used to avarice the noun, as opposed to the adjective. We’re used to describing people as full of avarice, as opposed to being avaricious. But it makes for a nicer word than saying greedy all of the time.

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Weird Word: Supercilious

by on Nov.04, 2013, under Articles, Writing

Supercilious

Adjective

  • Arrogantly superior; showing contemptuous indifference; haughty.

Other Forms:

  • superciliousness

Example Usage:

“Please, Margaret. Don’t be supercilious. At least give them reason to believe the truth of our superiority,” Roger said as he focused all his will upon the group of humans, forcing them, one by one, to kneel before the pair.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Such a silly sounding word for such an annoying trait. It almost reads as super silly to me or perhaps super callous, which is perhaps more to the truth. Still it is a great adjective for describing a person or their actions. It can be used to reinforce the impression of a character’s actions as haughty or arrogant in what some might consider a supercilious way!

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Weird Word: Furtive

by on Oct.28, 2013, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Furtive

Adjective

  1. Stealthy
  2. Exhibiting guilty or evasive secrecy.

Other Forms:

  • furtively
  • furtiveness

Example Usage:

“You think I didn’t see the furtive glances you kept giving each other? I see everything!” she screamed, waving the plasma caster at the couple, who cringed into each other, drawing her attention from the furtively escaping man in the far corner.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

I’ve heard, or rather read, this word before but its exact meaning has escaped me all these years. For some reason context had chosen a meaning similar to shrewd or quick, rather than stealthy. That aside it is a rather fun word to say which is also why it is appearing in Weird Words.

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Weird Word: Trenchant

by on Oct.14, 2013, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Trenchant

Adjective

  • (obsolete) Fitted to trench or cut; gutting; sharp.
  • (figuratively) Keen; biting; vigorously effective and articulate; severe; as, trenchant wit.

Example Usage:

I found the act quiet trenchant, save for the bit at the end, where they tried to quote Star Wars for an extra laugh; I had never been one to enjoy pandering to a crowd, even if I was one of the crowd.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Want to confuse someone? Use the word trenchant. It’ll confuse them most likely because they’ve never heard the word, but assuming they had, which meaning shall we attribute? The obsolete or figurative meaning? A word that literally has no meaning, because the old meaning is obsolete and the new meaning is the opposite of the old meaning and only meant to be used as a metaphor for the quality of a thing. Note I’m using the neoclassical definition of literally here, where I mean figuratively. Confused yet?

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