Tag: Noun

Weird Word: Glabella

by on Mar.03, 2014, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Glabella

Noun

  • (anatomy) The space between the eyebrows and the nose.
  • (zoology) The axial protuberance on the cephalon of certain arthropods (especially trilobites)

Example Usage:

“You have a little something-” “On my mouth? Oh, how embarrassing.” “No, um-” “On my dress? Oh dear!” “Not exactly-” “Well then where?!” “Your glabella.” “I will not be talked to that way!” “No, Ma’am, its your face-” “Are you saying I look like an insect!? !” “What? No I-” “Sir, I think we’re going to have to ask you to leave.”

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

I don’t actually have a problem with people who have hair in their glabella, or what is more commonly known has a unibrow. I think the look gets a bad rap from old cartoons, where all the bad guys had unibrows. But now you know what that the name of that place is, so you can tell your beautician exactly where you wish the hair removed.

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Weird Word: Reification

by on Feb.17, 2014, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Reification

Noun

  • The consideration of an abstract thing as if it were concrete, or of an inanimate object as if it were living.
  • The consideration of a human being as an impersonal object.

Example Usage:

“Your reficiation of the chairs in this lab are really starting to annoy me,” I said as I sat, a little too quick to stop myself from setting off the whoopee cushion hidden beneath the seat’s cover, which sent giggles through out of the laboratory staff. “So you’re saying that was you and not the chair?” Ry’leu retorted with a knowing snicker.

Alternative Forms

  • reify

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

What bugged me initially was that I wasn’t sure what the difference was between Reification and Personification. Turns out the two are very similar but not quiet the same. Personification is literary technique writing as well as a way of asserting qualities or roles of one thing onto another thing, such as the Grim Reaper being the personification of death. Reification on the other hand is basically the opposite of objectification, where you would treat death not as a the grim reaper, but as something you could use, carry around, or draw a smiley face on.

Still the word makes me think it just wants to repeat something over and over and over.

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Weird Word: Theranostics

by on Jan.20, 2014, under Weird Words, Writing

Theranostics

Noun

  • A form of diagnostic therapy that tests patient’s reaction to medication

Example Usage:

“It is theranostics you see,” Abel said as he pulled the hot poker from the fire. “We’ll poke him with this and see how he reacts. He’ll feel better afterwards, I’m sure.”

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

I’m betting this is the same stuff that placebos fall under, as well as that neat effect where people get sick because they thing they are sick, when in actuality they are sick but not for the reasons they think they are sick. Anyway Abel definitely is not using the word correctly but then again, maybe hot pokers are a form of medication where it comes from.

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Weird Word: Palpebra

by on Jan.06, 2014, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Palpebra

Noun

  • The eyelid.

Example Usage:

“That is the biggest palpebra I have ever seen,” the doctor said. “Help me lift it. We can see what type of ocular apparatus the creature uses.”

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Need another word for eyelid? No? Really? I could have sworn… This definitely falls under a weird word that you’re only going to use if you’re in a medical field in some way shape or form. Or if you want to sound really smart.

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Weird Word Argosy

by on Dec.30, 2013, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Argosy

Noun

  • A merchant ship.
  • A merchant flotilla, fleet.
  • A collection of lore.

Example Usage:

“The argosy should arrive within a week, Sir,” the aid reported, offering a multi-page report across the table. “They’ve reported the loss of two ships but the Fair Weather is still in tact.”

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

So this I think is actually a weird word. It’d be hard even without significant context to determine if the plurality of the word, at least when referring to its naval meaning. As a friend pointed out, even the statement “The argosy had us surrounded” could be ambiguous, assuming one invented an extendable rubber boat.

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Weird Word: Hippodrome

by on Dec.23, 2013, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Hippodrome

Noun

  • A horse racing course.

Verb

  • To stage a baseball game to suit gamblers.

Example Usage:

A hippodrome was not a good place to hippodrome a baseball game, mostly because the horses added extra variables which made it hard to calculate the odds for bets.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

What I don’t understand is why this word doesn’t involve hippos in any way shape or form. What I also don’t understand is how this word has any relation to baseball. I think I just don’t understand this word.

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Weird Word: Jitney

by on Dec.16, 2013, under Weird Words, Writing

Jitney

Noun

  • A small bus or minibus which typically operates service on a fixed route, sometimes scheduled.
  • An unlicensed taxi cab.
  • A shared-ride taxi.
  • A small coin, a nickel.
  • Very inexpensive.
  • A fraudulent arrangement whereby a broker who has direct access to an exchange executes trades on behalf of a broker who doesn’t.

Example Usage:

It was a jitney, that was it is an inexpensive ride, had space enough for two, and was completely untraceable, that would likely get them there.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Here’s a word that has no idea what it wants to mean. Sure half of the meanings relate to some kind of public transportation but each meaning is very different. I also have the distinct impression this word is a British word, even though its etymology is very specifically American, relating to a 5-cent coin used for busses and taxis.

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Weird Word: Tarradiddle

by on Dec.09, 2013, under Weird Words, Writing

Tarradiddle

Noun

  • A trivial lie.
  • Silly talk or writing; humbug.

Example Usage:

“You, Madam, are just full of tarradiddles and flattery, but please don’t think I want you to stop!”

SourceWiktionary, World Wide Words

Commentary:

Starting our little series on words stolen from the website World Wide Words is tarradiddle! If you’ve never visited, the World Wide Words is not unlike these posts, but with far more information, and in my personal opinion, has a better collection of odd and strange words in some cases. Hence why we’re stealing some of their words! Tarradiddle is one of those highly amusing words to both read and say and I feel fits its meanings very well. I hope you enjoy it!

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Weird Word: Denouement

by on Dec.02, 2013, under Weird Words, Writing

Denouement

Noun

  • The conclusion or resolution of a plot.

Example Usage:

This was not the denouement of her quest, if she had anything to say about it. Sure, the prince was rescued, the dragon saved, and the kingdom lay in ruins, but there was one thing yet unfinished; make the villains pay for what they did to her hair!

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Anybody else read denouncement every time they look at denouement? Me too! But I’ve fallen in love with this word. A word meaning the end of a plot. I assumed such a word existed but now both of us know what it is! We just need to work it into normal conversation. There is a footnote that this word is often used metaphorically, which I find interesting as well. Calling something that isn’t a denouement a denouement to impart some sort of meaning that it finished off something seems difficult to manage. Probably only because this word has likely fallen out of common usage.

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Weird Word: Palaver

by on Nov.11, 2013, under Articles, Writing

Palaver

Noun

  • Talk, especially unnecessary talk, fuss.
  • A meeting at which there is much talk; a debate.
  • Disagreement

Verb

  • To discuss with much talk.

Other Forms:

  • palavers
  • palavering
  • palavered

Example Usage:

“Shit. Palaver Pila,” he muttered. Pila was called Pila the Palaver because was willing to talk to just about anyone, for the right price, or the right motivation, which meant she was great when you wanted something, and less so when the cops wanted something on you.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Now he is a weird word and I love it. You need a replacement word for chatter box? Here you go, all in one word. Plus it alliterates nicely with people’s names who start with the letter p, so you can use this uncommon word as part of a name or title to subtly signify personality traits. Or not so subtly in the case of my example above.

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