Weird Word: Umpty

by on Feb.03, 2014, under Articles

Umpty

Adjective

  • Being indefinite, unspecified

Example Usage:

The distance between the two worlds was umpty, if only because distance was not a concept the universe had opted to define yet.

Derived terms

  • umpteen
  • umptillion

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Every heard the expression “For the umpteen time…”? I did somewhere. I think more in my childhood. Perhaps a sitcom. I always assumed it was one of those made up numbers! It is! But it based off of something. The word umpty! Which was probably created from the made up number. This another fun word to say, but it keeps making me think of Humpty Dumpty which only proper nouns.

Share
Leave a Comment :, more...

Weird Word: Facinorous

by on Jan.27, 2014, under Weird Words, Writing

Facinorous

Adjective

  • Extremely wicked

Example Usage:

“Bullying Bough Bettle!” “Wicked Wacker!” “Facinorous Fecal Matter!” they crowd shouted, throwing every manner of confusing insult they could.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

I like this word. My spellchecker doesn’t but it rarely likes the words I post here. This in another one of those words that sounds evil which means it nicely fits our definition. It also feels like it has some relation to noses but I don’t know why I feel that way.

1 Comment : more...

Weird Word: Theranostics

by on Jan.20, 2014, under Weird Words, Writing

Theranostics

Noun

  • A form of diagnostic therapy that tests patient’s reaction to medication

Example Usage:

“It is theranostics you see,” Abel said as he pulled the hot poker from the fire. “We’ll poke him with this and see how he reacts. He’ll feel better afterwards, I’m sure.”

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

I’m betting this is the same stuff that placebos fall under, as well as that neat effect where people get sick because they thing they are sick, when in actuality they are sick but not for the reasons they think they are sick. Anyway Abel definitely is not using the word correctly but then again, maybe hot pokers are a form of medication where it comes from.

Leave a Comment : more...

Free Write #73: Swiftly Tilting Mirrors

by on Jan.15, 2014, under Entertainment, Free Write, Writing

Free writing returns! Nothing regular, I just needed two-hundred and fifty words to keep my streak going on the magic spreadsheet. Todays story is inspired by the Twitch TV show A Swiftly Tilting Cameron, apart of the Loading Ready Run lineup of video game streaming. Cameron is currently XCOM: Enemy Within.

~~~

Swiftly Tilting Mirrors
By Nojh Livic

The mirror was affixed to the wall on the left across from her old locker. She ignored it. Was she the right word? Or was she now an it? Or a they?

She looked down her torso. That was a mistake. Old familiar curves were gone, replaced by broad flat metal. She knew that was only for the mission but it disturbed her.

Instead she focused on her arms. She flexed them. They obeyed her thoughts so it was easier to think of them as hers. But was it the arms that were obeying her thoughts or was she obeying their movements?

She wanted to look in the mirror but she couldn’t stand the idea of not seeing her face. Did they take that from her too in order to save the world?

“Let’s go Eli. We got another one in Africa.”

She thought she had volunteered for this. No that wasn’t exactly right. She had volunteered for the mission, for the world. This was needed for the mission.

She tightened the metal fingers into fists. She knew how much pressure she was squeezing into each digit but she couldn’t feel it.

“Iris?”

Eli “Iris” Dawson let go. Hefting her robotic form to its oversized feet, she lifted her impossibly heavy weapon, checked that the breach was clear with an audible clack, then laid it against her shoulder and turned to the faceless commander who had made her this way.

“Reporting for duty, sir.”

She didn’t need mirrors to blow up aliens.

This was her job.

Leave a Comment :, , more...

Weird Word: Banausic

by on Jan.13, 2014, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Banausic

Adjective

  • mechanical; materialistic, uncultured.
  • utilitarian

Example Usage:

To say Marla was banausic was to be factually correct while also completely wrong, for while she was made of metal and coveted the odd fashion now and again, one could never claim that she lacked social grace.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

A weird word if only because its definition is so weird. I’m not sure if mechanical is meant to mean materialistic and uncultured? Perhaps this was an archaic meaning of mechanical? The utilitarian definition was far easier to use. I am not sure I’ll be using this word if only because I don’t know if know what it really means, despite looking it up!

Leave a Comment : more...

The science behind the angel’s glow that saved civil war soliders

by on Jan.08, 2014, under Articles, Science

I read an interesting article on Mental Floss about a pair of kids who seem likely to be apart of our next generation of scientists. Back in 2001, a then seven-year old Bill Martin went on a school field trip and learned about a phenomena  during the American Civil War where some soldiers after a battle, who waited days in the cold and mud, reported that their wounds glowed faintly in the dark. It was noted that the soldiers who exhibited this glowing had a higher survival rate than others who didn’t, and it was named Angel’s Glow.

Some hundred and forty years later, the child of a microbiologist, asked the question if perhaps it was glowing bacteria. Together with his friend Jon Curtis, they did research, and experiments, and won the 2001 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair.

What were their results? The answer, as it is with anything to do with real science, is that it is complicated. The glowing was due to bacteria, however the bacteria in question lived inside the stomach of parasitic worms. The two had a semi-symbiotic relationship where the worm would burrow itself into an insect and puke out the bacteria. The bacteria would then kill and break down the insect as well as any other microorganisms. The worm would then eat the remains of the insect, as well as the bacteria, where the bacteria would then continue to grow in the worm’s stomach.

However the bacteria and worm in question are normally killed by a human’s internal body heat, which ruled them out as a possibility, until the kids hypothesized that the soldiers, after spending days in the cold and mud, actually had hypothermia which would lower core body temperature enough to allow these worms to survive, and once the humans were well, would be cleared by the human immune system.

So the ultimate result was that a combination of hypothermia, parasitic worms, and glowing bacteria saved many soldiers lives.

Want more details? Click here to read the source article.

Source [Mental Floss]

Comments Off : more...

Writing Time: Everlasting #77

by on Jan.07, 2014, under Articles, Writing, Writing Updates

Writing Session(s)

Word Count: 258

Happy New Year! I did almost no writing over the holidays. Prior to the holidays I did some writing on a new design project, which I’ll talk about below. Today as the first normal writing session of the new year where I wasn’t on vacation. I’m going to be trying the two hundred and fifty words per day method of finishing Everlasting, although yesterday I opted for my words to count towards working on Weird Words and doing blog updates. Today I obviously reached the goal and I might write some more after this post is done.

Everlasting Update

Novel Word Count: 178,379 (+258)
Outline Word Count: 36,744 (+0)

Doing small updates is interesting. I finished off a scene I had previously written, which was a nice natural stopping point. Honestly writing 250 words is easy as long as I sit down to do it, which I guess is the point. The scene written was the beginning of the abbreviated romantic arc I have between two characters where they are having a disagreement. I, of course, am having second thoughts if the storyline will actually work, but inner editor can suck it! Huzzah!

Editing & Critiques

Currently not editing or critiquing anything.

New Projects

Magic the Gathering Organizer

So little to no work has been done on this, which is somewhat my fault. I think it’ll be on hiatus.

Unnamed Board Game codename Platform

New project. I was inspired by a kickstarter that I won’t reveal to design a board game. I’m not going to reveal many details about it for now but I will be working on it.

Other Works

Free Write - Hiatus.

Station – Waiting to be edited.

Matrix – Hiatus.

Gerald – Waiting to be continued.

Reconfigure – Waiting to be turned into an actual short story.

Leave a Comment :, more...

Weird Word: Palpebra

by on Jan.06, 2014, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Palpebra

Noun

  • The eyelid.

Example Usage:

“That is the biggest palpebra I have ever seen,” the doctor said. “Help me lift it. We can see what type of ocular apparatus the creature uses.”

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

Need another word for eyelid? No? Really? I could have sworn… This definitely falls under a weird word that you’re only going to use if you’re in a medical field in some way shape or form. Or if you want to sound really smart.

Leave a Comment : more...

Weird Word Argosy

by on Dec.30, 2013, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Argosy

Noun

  • A merchant ship.
  • A merchant flotilla, fleet.
  • A collection of lore.

Example Usage:

“The argosy should arrive within a week, Sir,” the aid reported, offering a multi-page report across the table. “They’ve reported the loss of two ships but the Fair Weather is still in tact.”

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

So this I think is actually a weird word. It’d be hard even without significant context to determine if the plurality of the word, at least when referring to its naval meaning. As a friend pointed out, even the statement “The argosy had us surrounded” could be ambiguous, assuming one invented an extendable rubber boat.

Leave a Comment : more...

Weird Word: Hippodrome

by on Dec.23, 2013, under Articles, Weird Words, Writing

Hippodrome

Noun

  • A horse racing course.

Verb

  • To stage a baseball game to suit gamblers.

Example Usage:

A hippodrome was not a good place to hippodrome a baseball game, mostly because the horses added extra variables which made it hard to calculate the odds for bets.

SourceWiktionary

Commentary:

What I don’t understand is why this word doesn’t involve hippos in any way shape or form. What I also don’t understand is how this word has any relation to baseball. I think I just don’t understand this word.

Leave a Comment :, more...

Calendar

April 2014
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

Archives